Trousse-Chemise Pinot Noir
Trousse-Chemise Pinot Noir
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Trousse-Chemise Pinot Noir
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Trousse-Chemise Pinot Noir

Trousse-Chemise Pinot Noir

Regular price
$150.00
Sale price
$150.00
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
per 

Hi Folks,


The perfect Turkey Wine is pinot noir.  The perfect Turkey Wine is a delicious affordable pinot noir that will satisfy yourself and which you don't feel bad about pouring for Uncle Harry and your mother-in-law.    The perfect Turkey Wine is an American pinot noir, as Thanksgiving is one of our most American holidays.   The perfect Turkey Wine for 2020 is Trousse-Chemise 2018 Pinot Noir Dundee Hills from Oregon.  The perfect Turkey Wine is a tiny production, dry farmed, organic and biodynamic principled pinot noir from one of Willamette Valley's top sub-AVAs made by female winemaker Anne Sery, who came from Burgundy to learn how to make wine in Oregon at Domaine Salena under the tutelage of Laurant Montileu. The Trousse project is her way of paying homage to her motherland while highlighting the unique flavors of Pinot grapes grown on the famous Jory soils of Dundee.  The NYC restaurant scene took notice and her wines were poured at some of the city's top restaurants including Daniel, Mandarin Oriental, The Dutch, Little Park, and Chinese Tuxedo. But with the close of so many restaurants, many of these placements vanished and the consequence is we can get you THE PERFECT TURKEY WINE FOR THE LOWEST PRICE IN AMERICA, NEARLY HALF OF WHAT YOU WOULD NORMALLY PAY.  Money back guaranteed good.   

 

Trousse-Chemise 2018 Pinot Noir Dundee Hills - $30
6 - PACK PRICE - $150 ($25 PER BOTTLE)
12 - PACK PRICE - $276 ($23 PER BOTTLE)

*do not confuse this wine with the straight Willamette Valley bottling, this is the special Dundee Hills Cuvee

 

As the daughter of a French diplomat, Anne Sery-Martindale grew up around fabulous Burgundies from producers like Ghislaine Barthod, Christophe Roumier, and Louis Boillot, which sparked her own passion for Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, and led her to pursue winemaking as a profession. After university studies with famed enologist Denis Dubourdieu, Anne moved to Oregon, and continued her training with Laurent Montalieu at Soléna Estate in Yamhill. Currently, Anne is the winemaker at Montalieu’s Hyland Estates and NW Wine Company in McMinnville, which gives her access to some of the best grapes in Oregon, as well as a state-of-the-art facility for her own custom winemaking.

A Wine's Quality Is Determined In The Glass.


Shane Benson | Owner | New York Vintners   

 

Q. WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE BEVERAGE TO DRINK DURING THE WINTER MONTHS?
A. I really enjoy drinking bourbon and whiskey-based cocktail at this time of the year. My favorite is an Old-Fashioned, but I also enjoy Manhattans.

Q. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE THING ABOUT WINTER?
A. Winter is a great time to work on planning, whether it’s planning on new trials/projects for the next vintage or planning my spring/summer garden.

Q. WHAT HOBBIES DO YOU FINALLY HAVE TIME TO ENJOY DURING THE CELLAR SEASON?
A. It’s the perfect time to work on my baking since I’m stuck indoors.

Q. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE PLACE TO GRAB A WINTER COCKTAIL?
A. I really like the ambiance and the cocktails at Jo’s bar on 23rd. Plus that way we can slip next door and have dessert afterwards…

Q. WHAT WINES AND FOODS ARE TYPICALLY ON YOUR TABLE THIS SEASON?
A. I enjoy fixing stews and hearty soups at this time of the year. And I always pair them with a Chardonnay (I could drink Chardonnay with almost anything).

Q. HOW DO YOU AND YOUR STAFF BEAT THE WINTER BLUES?
A. We organize baking competitions. I’ve always believed that homemade sweets are the best remedy for any type of blues.

Anne Sery and Laurent Montalieu / Photo by Melissa D. Jones

For Sery, summer vacations meant travel from her birthplace and home on Réunion Island to Burgundy. There, her Pinot-loving parents had purchased some small vineyards in the Côte de Nuits region, where she eagerly lent a hand from age 11. She began to do more vineyard work for Domaine Hubert Lignier in Morey-St-Denis when she was 14, pulling leaves and dropping fruit.

“That’s when I realized that I wanted to be a vigneron,” she says, and then jokes. “At that point, I had never seen Burgundy in the winter yet.”

Sery’s education continued with undergraduate studies in Dijon, followed by a master’s degree in viticulture and oenology from the National School of Agricultural Engineering of Bordeaux and a diploma in enology from the University of Bordeaux. Looking to work abroad, she interned at Beaux Frères, where she met Montalieu, who later brought her to Soléna Estate.

Montalieu was also schooled in Bordeaux, but after an internship at Mumm Napa, had decided to remain in America. Oregon’s Bridgeview Vineyard and Winery recruited him as its winemaker in 1988.

“True to the Oregonian spirit, it was in the middle of nowhere, and in all aspects from the vineyard to the winery, you had to make things work,” says Montalieu. “Not only did I have to grow and make wines from the untamed ground of Southern Oregon, I had to do it without all the winemaking bells and whistles. It was an experience that challenged me in new ways.”

He ventured from Bridgeview to WillaKenzie Estate and then started Soléna Estate with his wife, Danielle Andrus Montalieu. The two went on to launch NW Wine Company in 2003, a custom-crush facility for a slew of brands, with John Niemeyer of Oregon Wine Services.

Montalieu’s current focus is on Soléna Estate, Hyland Estates and Westmount Wine Company, projects that target different aspects of the national Oregon Pinot Noir market.

Vibrant acidity, Montalieu believes, is the core strength of Willamette Valley wines. “It really drives their style and ageworthiness,” he says. “You combine that with Pinot Noir, which has the amazing capability to reflect the ground that it is grown in, and you have Oregon in its current state.”

- WINE ENTHUSIAST

The French Connection in Oregon:From left to right; Thomas Savre of Lingua Franca, Véronique Boss-Drouhin of Domaine Drouhin Oregon and Caballus Cellars; Laurent Montalieu of NW Wine Company; Isabelle Dutartre of De Ponte Cellars, Caballus Cellars and 1789 Wines; Guillaume Large of Résonance; Anne Sery of NW Wine Company and Bruno Corneaux of Domaine Divio / Photo by Melissa D. Jones

The Willamette Valley
 

The Willamette Valley ISs home to nearly 600 wineries. It is recognized as one of the premier Pinot noir–producing areas in the world.

The Willamette Valley is a huge and varied appellation that includes seven nested appellations: Chehalem Mountains, Dundee Hills, Eola-Amity Hills, McMinnville, Ribbon Ridge, Van Duzer Corridor and Yamhill-Carlton.

Buffered from Pacific storms on the west by the Coast Range, the valley follows the Willamette River north to south for more than a hundred miles from the Columbia River near Portland to just south of Eugene. To the east, the Cascade Range draws the boundary between the Willamette Valley’s misty, cool climate and the drier, more extreme climate of eastern Oregon.

At its widest point, this long, broad valley spans sixty miles. Overall, the climate boasts a long, gentle growing season – warm summers with cool evenings; bursts of Indian summer into fall; mild winters followed by long springs. In ideal years the maritime climate provides the best conditions possible for growing the cool-climate grape variety for which Oregon is best known: Pinot noir. In lesser years, fall weather can be tricky, causing winemakers to pull their hair. By this measure the Willamette Valley compares favorably with the Burgundy and Alsace regions of France. And, like it or not, the often finicky Willamette Valley climate is the promised land for Pinot noir in America. Wineries also produce Pinot gris, Pinot blanc, Chardonnay, Riesling, Melon, Gewürztraminer, sparkling wine, Sauvignon blanc, Syrah and Gamay, among other lesser-known varieties.